Monthly Archives: January 2013

This town was built on nepotism, the old boy network. Because it is so.

One Imperative is a thematic Art/Lit zine curated by Jeremy Fernando, to which I’m a regular contributor. The past issue, Issue 9′s theme is Literary (re)view, it’s here: http://www.oneimperative.com/2013/01/09-reviews/.  However, I was worried that people didn’t pay attention at all, and still more important, something I read today on Facebook made me feel necessary to repost. This time I even did copy & paste. See how desperate I am to get my message across?

Tight-fisted words

(Integrating quotations from a literary text into a literary analysis)

By Julie O’Yang

1.

“…The peonies in front of the entrance suggests something splendidly Chinese,”

spoke Lady Saisho.

“No,” I answered, “now that they dislike me so much, I start to dislike them too.”

“You must try to see the whole thing with a mild eye,” she smiled.

Afterwards I went to visit the Empress. I couldn’t find out what she

really thought about the matter. However, I caught her words when she

whispered to the Ladies: “Well, you know, she is on friendly terms with Minister

of the Left and his circle.”

While I was leaving the room, I saw they were busy gossiping. But as

soon as they saw me, they stopped talking all of a sudden and everyone

went back to work. I was not used to the way they treated me and felt

badly hurt. Since the incident, Her Majesty had sent for me several

times, and I ignored her requests and didn’t visit her again for a long

time. Undoubtedly, the Ladies insisted that I belonged to the side of her

enemies and they spread all sorts of lies about me.

From The Pillow Book by Sei Shōnagon (清少納言), c. 966–1017

2.

It is the nature of the artist to mind excessively what is said about him.

Literature is strewn with the wreckage of men who have minded beyond

reason the opinions of others.

Virginia Woolf, A Room of One’s Own

***

I honestly think you should go back to earlier issues to find more one imperatives.  It’s from the energetic, sparkling Asia — because it is so — and it’s right here: http://www.oneimperative.com/

Jeremy Fernando is a Singaporean poet, writer, philosopher and critic, and his latest book, Writing Death, is an almost-perfect combination of these vocations. Recently described in a Singaporean magazine as “Asia’s Sexiest Philosopher”.

Because it is so.

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The Blue Kite (蓝风筝) is a 1993 drama film directed by Tian Zhuangzhuang. Banned by the Chinese government upon its completion, along with a ten year ban on filmmaking imposed on Tian.

Genre: Fiction, Drama | Length: 140 min

 

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Who knows where the night will begin or where it could all lead? Grab a copy, close your eyes, run your finger over…me

A Review

By Liam Lyles

When one picks up the dainty novel Butterfly by Julie O’Yang one does not consider the journey they are about to go on.

Butterfly is a novel of time and proportion, a huge swell of ebb and flow that takes the reader back and forth through time and place that can leave the reader dizzy but intently cognizant. The tone is chaotic if the reader is not used to a frenetic pace from a quality craft however is ticked away in good timing the deeper the reader invests. This strong language and vivid counterculture is far more cagy than those radio interviews I have heard the author’s tiny voice in. There is vibrato and compunction here to be sure that this reader did not expect from a small bound book.

The history in the novel is shaking and if the reader is not stirred by the emotions from the experiences within then my guess is that the reader has missed the mark in their chest altogether.

There is plenty of fiction and mythological nature that soars ravenously, especially for a butterfly, however soars nonetheless. The author takes her dialogue through cynical and macabre approach where the tongue is shaved dry of it use in forming the words. The author’s use of dialogue is a key strength that this reader was spellbound over. This book is read with the mind and the heart and not the air from the mouth.

My research shows this as the only current novel by this author and I will have to say that I am starving already for the next read.

Review originally published on GoodReads. Click here.

Order your print copy on Amazon or Barnes&Noble.

Butterfly, a novel by Julie O’Yang is also available in all eBook formats, including iPad, Kindle, Nook, Sony Reader, Kobo, Copia, Gardners,  Baker & Taylor, eBookPie

&

eSentral, the biggest eBook retailer in Southeast Asia, with stores in Malaysia, Singapore, and Indonesia, and more countries in the region.

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I thoroughly love online translation tools

Handwriting from 17th century. Nalan Xingde was a Machu poet, scholar and calligrapher.

Handwriting from 17th century. Nalan Xingde was a Machu poet, scholar and calligrapher.

长相思

(清)纳兰性德

山一程,

水一程,

身向榆关那畔行,

夜深千帐灯。

风一更,

雪一更,

聒碎乡心梦不成,

故园无此声。

The point is, well, some time back I was assigned by a Dutch TV production company to translate/localise a children’s television series for the Chinese market. A job’s a job, as  usual I started immediately. A few days later, my client telephoned me, and he complained a little bit about the “European” (=my) prices why is it necessary so and so. It turned out that a translation agency in Shanghai had approached him and quoted their current rates.

Of course, I went to check out the agency’s website at once and found an online translator. I typed in the poem by Nalan to be tough in the toughest sport of all ;P. This is the output:

Lights in mountain, “Sauvignon Blanc” (clear) a ride, water, a process the body to the elm off banks OK, late at night, 1,000 accounts lights. Wind, snow one more Mighty broken Township heart dream is not, Brideshead Revisited is no such sound.

Poetry  is what gets lost in translation? I don’t think so.

The moral of the story is I got the job in the end because I told my client I’m the best. He believed me. But I do love Shanghai translation tool!

“Translation is the art of failure.” Yes, Umberto Eco.

“The original is unfaithful to the translation.” Yes, Jorge Luis Borges.

“…but fantastic writing in translation is the summit.” Doubly so.  This line is dedicated to my/all translators.

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“Asia’s Sexiest Philosopher”

One Imperative is a thematic Art/Lit zine curated by Jeremy Fernando, to which I’m a regular contributor.

The new Issue 9’s theme is Literary (re)view

http://www.oneimperative.com/2013/01/09-reviews/. Find my piece on p.7, but it’s so pretty, I honestly think you should read everything!

And

go back to earlier issues to find more me and others: http://www.oneimperative.com/

Jeremy Fernando is a Singaporean poet, writer, philosopher and critic, and his latest book, Writing Death, is analmost-perfect combination of these vocations. Recently described in a Singaporean magazine as “Asia’s Sexiest Philosopher”.

Because it is so.

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Oops I didn’t know I was pregnant

Life is getting more and more (in)tangible nowadays. For instance, this morning when I opened my gmail, I read an annunciation relating to the matter of immaculate faith & heart. It reads like this:

***

THE EDITORS OF

DOORKNOBS & BODYPAINT

NOMINATE THE FOLLOWING FOR

THE 2012 MICRO AWARDS*

 […names I don’t know, so there’s no point to mention. Sorry.]

Science of Discontent: Julie O’Yang. Issue 68, November, 2012

***

Doug Mathewson, my dear Editor and good friend, it’s still very early in Holland and I didn’t prepare my Oscar speech before I went to bed last night (don’t have one in my drawer either). However I feel happy and blessed with my surprise pregnancy, I know that people are never convinced of your anything, of your sincerity, except by your death. I’m glad that my sincerity was answered with sincerity. I’m glad that you faked it, Doug, and I hope you don’t regret tomorrow. ;D

THANK YOU VERY MUCH!

{The Micro Award is a literary prize, presented annually for outstanding flash fiction not exceeding 1000 words. The Micro Award was founded in 2008 by author Robert Laughlin to recognize outstanding flash fiction from both print and electronic media. The award is for $500.}

Here are two earlier posts you may want to check out:

1. Short and concise https://julieoyang.wordpress.com/2012/12/04/on-planet-betty-turandu-lei-ying-humans-watch-an-entirely-different-kind-of-soap-opera-check-out/

2. Big and pretentious, but as always, I deserve an effort  https://julieoyang.wordpress.com/2012/12/05/to-understand-me-you-need-to-have-had-near-death-experience/

                                                                                   ♥

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Michelangelo Antonioni: Chung Kuo/Kingdom of the Middle

In 1972, during the Cultural Revolution, the Italian director/filmmaker Michelangelo Antonioni was invited by the People’s Republic of China to make a documentary about New China. The result was a three-and-a-half-hour long film, divided into three parts. Mao disliked it so much that Michelangelo Antonioni was consequently charged with being anti-Chinese as well as counterrevolutionary. The movie was finally shown at Beijing’s Cinema Institute 30 years later.

The following fragment shows Beijing, China’s capital, including the main shopping district Wang Fu Jing, Temple of Heaven, and more faces and places.

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Your profoundly designed life insurance

Creativity is not about a nice interior or a nice wardrobe or a sense of design. It’s about a very subtle way to think and to realize, if this doesn’t work, then I can solve things in another way; confidence and flexibility. Creativity is like life insurance. If you are creative, you are never afraid, because you can design yourself out of any situation and give answers to difficult problems.

Li Edelkoort

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Ten forbidden films in the People’s Republic of China: 1. To live. With English subtitles.

Length: 130 min | Genre: Drama

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s9zx53aof08https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s9zx53aof08

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